Under Texas law, robbery is defined as the intentional, knowing, or reckless taking of property from another person, with the intent to deprive them of the property, and in the course of committing the theft, intentionally, knowingly, or recklessly causing bodily injury to another person, threatening or placing another person in fear of imminent bodily injury or death, or committing or threatening to commit a felony.

In other words, for an act to be considered a robbery in Texas, it must involve both the taking of property from another person and the use or threat of violence or force to accomplish the theft. If the theft is accomplished without the use or threat of force, it is considered a theft, rather than a robbery.

Under Texas law, robbery is considered a second-degree felony, punishable by a prison term of 2 to 20 years, and a fine of up to $10,000. If the robbery involves the use of a deadly weapon, the offense is elevated to a first-degree felony, punishable by a prison term of 5 to 99 years, or life imprisonment, and a fine of up to $10,000.